Stockton-on-Tees Local Plan Apr 1991 – Mar 2006

Transport

Introduction

5.1 Transport is a key issue which is fundamentally related to the economic, environmental and social well-being of the community. Transport opportunities and constraints are a major influence on land use planning and details of access, car parking and provision for pedestrians are important factors in detailed development control decisions.

5.2 Responsibility for transport is fragmented. Central Government – specifically the Department of Transport (DoT) – sets the overall policy context as well as, through its agencies, being responsible for the planning and maintenance of the motorway and trunk road network (within Stockton, A19 and A66). The Borough Council is the Highway Authority for all other roads within its area.

5.3 The trunk roads in Stockton, with the exception of the A66 west of Teesside Park, are covered by a Design, Build, Finance and Operate (DBFO) contract awarded to Autolink, a private sector consortium. This contract, which commenced on 17th February, 1997, includes the A19 Norton-Parkway widening scheme as well as a 30 year maintenance agreement for all the roads covered.

5.4 The Borough Council’s transport strategy is set out in the Transport Policies and Programme (TPP), prepared in association with its neighbour authorities within the Tees Valley area and submitted to the DoT on an annual basis. The underlying principles of the strategy are:-

5.5 A key component of the TPP submission is the ‘Teesside Package’, covering the Stockton-on-Tees, Middlesbrough and Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council areas and administered jointly by the three authorities. The Package comprises a rolling programme of capital schemes designed to complement one another in meeting the common transport strategy within the overall context of the Structure Plan.

5.6 The Borough Council is also responsible for the management and maintenance of most of the highway infrastructure – including public car parks – within its area and, in association with its Package partners, supports local bus services financially where these cannot be provided on a commercial basis.

OBJECTIVES

OBJECTIVE 1

to provide for the safe and convenient movement of pedestrians, cyclists and people with disabilities.

Pedestrian links

5.7 All pedestrians should be able to walk in safety and comfort, whether it be from home to workplace, shops, community or leisure facilities. The Council wishes to ensure that people are able to make more local trips on foot. A number of recreational footpath routes are proposed in the Recreation section of the Plan (see Policies REC 11 and REC 20). However, more people can be encouraged to make their journey on foot if new development is designed to take account of the needs of pedestrians.

5.8 In proposing or assessing development the Council will seek to ensure the provision of facilities for pedestrians where this is appropriate. Wherever possible the pedestrian environment will be protected and improved, with an emphasis on the creation of a network of routes for commuting, shopping, access to community facilities and for leisure.

5.9 It is proposed to construct new footbridges across the Tees, one linking the Teesdale commercial area to the Castle Centre, and another from the University College campus over to the north bank of the River. These will provide valuable links between residential, commercial and educational centres.

5.10 Further upstream a number of opportunities are identified for the construction of footbridges along the Tees and Leven Valleys, with the aim of realising the recreational potential of the River and the proposed Country Park (see paragraph 4.88 and Policy REC 21).

5.11 A major commitment to the pedestrian was demonstrated by the project in Stockton town centre, where large scale pedestrianisation has been fundamental to the regeneration of the centre by virtue of the improved environment which it creates (see Policy SH 1).


TR 1 Interactive Map

DEVELOPMENT WHICH OBSTRUCTS THE PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION OF THE FOLLOWING BRIDGES ACROSS THE RIVER TEES WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.

(a.) FOOTBRIDGE LINKING THE TEESDALE COMMERCIAL AREA AND THE CASTLEGATE CENTRE; AND

(b.) BRIDGE FOR COMBINED PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLE USE LINKING UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CAMPUS TO THE NORTH BANK OF THE RIVER TEES.


Traffic Calming

5.12 The layout of many housing estates often gives rise to conflict between cars and pedestrians. The Council is anxious to reduce the risk of accidents as far as possible, and following the introduction of ‘traffic calming’ measures in the Newtown area of Stockton, a scheme is proposed for Hardwick. The need for such measures in other areas will be investigated and further schemes will be implemented accordingly. Priority will be given for such measures elsewhere according to proven accident records or exceptionally, for alleviation of nuisance in environmentally sensitive areas, for example, conservation areas.


TR 2 Interactive Map

A SCHEME OF TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES WILL BE IMPLEMENTED IN THE HARDWICK AREA OF STOCKTON TO REDUCE VEHICLE SPEEDS TO A MAXIMUM OF 20 MPH.


Provision for Cyclists

5.13 Cycling is a cheap, non-polluting and energy efficient form of personal transport which is becoming popular for short journeys and recreation. Where car journeys are replaced with journeys by bicycle, the local environmental benefits from reduced traffic congestion, noise and exhaust emissions. The build up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is also reduced and the free movement of all sections of the community within the Borough is assisted. Hence, the Council aims to ensure that reasonable accessibility is afforded to cyclists.

5.14 Many more journeys within the Borough could be made by bicycle; the terrain is fairly flat, the climate relatively dry, and the urban area is so compact that many existing trips are below the convenient cycling distance of 8 km (5 miles). Some people, however are deterred by fears of accidents and cycle theft, whilst others may be unaware that cycle routes exist.

Existing Cycle Routes

5.15 Isolated lengths of strategic cycle route do exist in the Borough, e.g. A19, West Stockton Cycle Route, whilst local cycle routes exist within large residential areas and other developments, e.g. Spital Flatts at Yarm, Ingleby Barwick and Teesdale. Parts of some cycle routes have suffered from poor lighting and vandalism. To address this, the Council will encourage feedback from cyclists to identify the problem areas, and to establish priorities for maintenance and improvement.


TR 3 Interactive Map

EXISTING CYCLE ROUTES WITHIN THE BOROUGH WILL BE PROTECTED AND WILL BE MAINTAINED AND IMPROVED AS NECESSARY.


New Routes Within the Built Up Area

5.16 To make cycling attractive, a comprehensive network of routes is required, linking residential areas with town centres, employment areas, local shopping facilities, public buildings (e.g. schools, health centres, leisure centres), parks, major open spaces and the countryside. The new routes identified will provide some of these links, and together with existing routes, will establish a strategic network across the Borough. Further development of this network, (originally identified by Cleveland County Council in their 1994 TPP submission) will be undertaken by the Council and partners, e.g. Teesside Development Corporation (routes along the Tees), and City Challenge (Billingham Beck Branch Line) once their precise alignment and feasibility has been established. Other links along and across the River Tees are identified in policies REC 20 and REC 21.

5.17 Many sections of the proposed routes will use existing roads and junction crossing points. Dropped kerbs, segregated road space and shared footways/cycleways will only be provided where existing highways cannot provide safety for cyclists.

5.18 During the plan period, the Borough Council also intends to promote some advisory recreational routes within the urban fringe. New routes may come forward as part of the Cleveland Community Forest Initiative. At Ingleby Barwick, the local network of cycleways will continue to be implemented as the development progresses. Provision is to be agreed with the developers through the Ingleby Barwick Footpaths and Cycleways Study.


TR 4 Interactive Map

A NETWORK OF CYCLE ROUTES ACROSS THE BOROUGH WILL BE DEVELOPED, PRIORITY TO BE GIVEN TO THE FOLLOWING:

(a.) SURTEES BRIDGE – TEES BRIDGE – BOROUGH BOUNDARY (SOUTH BANK OF THE RIVER TEES);

(b.) SURTEES BRIDGE – TEES BARRAGE – NEWPORT BRIDGE (NORTH BANK OF THE RIVER TEES);

(c.) STOCKTON TOWN CENTRE – PRESTON FARM – INGLEBY BARWICK (ALONG THORNABY BYPASS) – BOROUGH BOUNDARY;

(d.) LETCH LANE – NORTH TEES HOSPITAL – NEWHAM GRANGE PARK – STOCKTON TOWN CENTRE;

(e.) STOCKTON TOWN CENTRE – TILERY – MOUNT PLEASANT – NORTON;

(f.) THORNABY BYPASS – RIVER TEES (SOUTH BANK) – EAGLESCLIFFE;

(g.) INGLEBY BARWICK – BASSLETON COURT – AIRFIELD INDUSTRIAL ESTATE – THORNABY TOWN CENTRE – LITTLEBOY PARK;

(h.) WOLVISTON BACK LANE – LOW GRANGE – JOHN WHITEHEAD PARK & BILLINGHAM TOWN CENTRE;

(i.) BILLINGHAM BECK BRANCH LINE – TEES BARRAGE, STOCKTON;

(j.) LONG NEWTON – MARRICK ROAD, HARTBURN – GRANGEFIELD PARK – GREEN LANE, STOCKTON.


Provision for Cyclists in New Development

5.19 To protect cyclists from motor traffic turning into and parking at destinations, developers of proposals which may attract a significant proportion of trips by bicycle, e.g. offices, leisure and shopping outlets, should discuss with the Local Planning Authority at an early stage ‘on site’ design and layout to see whether separate provision for cyclists will be necessary.

5.20 Secure cycle parking at destinations is also essential if people are to be persuaded to cycle. The level of provision sought will take account of the number of people likely to be attracted to the development, the distance travelled to reach it, and the existence of any cycle parking facilities in the immediate vicinity. In general, cycle parking should be provided in well lit areas, capable of surveillance from nearby buildings or from passers-by. Developers should consult the Local Planning Authority, so that such facilities can be incorporated into the scheme at the design stage; otherwise, cycle parking may be secured through the imposition of a condition on a planning consent.


TR 5 (No map)

DEVELOPMENT LIKELY TO ATTRACT SIGNIFICANT FLOWS OF TRAFFIC WILL BE REQUIRED TO INCLUDE PROVISION FOR THE SAFE PASSAGE OF CYCLISTS ONTO AND WITHIN THE SITE, AND TO ANY EXISTING OR PROPOSED CYCLE ROUTES ADJOINING THE SITE.


TR 6 (No map)

DEVELOPMENT LIKELY TO ATTRACT SIGNIFICANT NUMBERS OF PEOPLE, WHETHER AS VISITORS OR EMPLOYEES, WILL BE REQUIRED TO PROVIDE ON SITE SECURE AND CONVENIENT CYCLE PARKING PROVISION, THE LEVEL OF SUCH PROVISION TO BE AGREED WITH THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY;


Cycle Parking at Existing Destinations

5.21 The Council is undertaking a programme of installing convenient and secure cycle parking facilities. The focus is on the Borough’s town and district centres, railway stations and public buildings which attract visits from the public, local shopping parades, parking and Community Forest ‘gateway’ sites.

Access for All

5.22 The needs of people with physical disabilities and those who have restricted mobility need to be taken into account in assessing any new development. Informal meetings already take place with representatives of people with disabilities on proposals for new development, and it is intended that these continue. It is essential that people with disabilities can enjoy easy access to a range of facilities and services.


TR 7 (No map)

THE BOROUGH COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO ENSURE THAT THE NEEDS OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES ARE MET THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

(i.) NEW DEVELOPMENTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO MAKE REASONABLE AND PRACTICAL PROVISION FOR ACCESS BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES;

(ii.) DROPPED KERBS, TEXTURED SURFACES AND RAMPED FOOTPATHS AND OTHER SPECIALISED FEATURES WILL BE PROVIDED WHERE APPROPRIATE;

(iii.) THE POSITION AND DESIGN OF STREET FURNITURE, LANDSCAPE FEATURES AND SIGNS WILL TAKE ACCOUNT OF THE NEEDS OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES.


OBJECTIVE 2

to support initiatives for a well developed and co-ordinated public transport system.

Public Transport – Light Rail or Bus Way System

5.23 A series of studies were carried out by the County Council into the feasibility of a light rail transit (LRT) system, with associated improvements to the bus and heavy rail system.

5.24 A public transport strategy was approved by the County Council and is currently the subject of consultation with the public and interested organisations. This strategy includes the development of busways (purpose built segregated rights of way for buses), green routes (where buses are given priority on existing roads) and upgrading rail services in the medium term. This strategy would still allow the use of higher technology systems, such as light rail transit, in the longer term. In addition, the role of the bus in Stockton town centre is being examined in conjunction with other land use proposals, acknowledging that immediate on-street accessibility for public transport passengers is important for the vitality of the High Street.

5.25 Further work is currently taking place on the proposed busways and green routes, the first of which is a route from Stockton town centre to Norton and Billingham. The aim is to develop a practical programme for implementation. In the meantime it is proposed to protect a number of corridors from development which would be likely to affect these routes.

5.26 The Hardwick to Old Middlesbrough Road corridor is part of the Council’s preferred first phase for light rail transit, which is a longer term proposal. In the medium term it is intended to construct parts of this route as busways to allow buses to bypass the worst traffic congestion. The busways will be from Stockton Station to Roseworth, and from Old Middlesbrough Road through Teesdale. A busway spur to Norton using the disused Billingham Beck branch rail line is also proposed. This in turn would link into the green route to Billingham, thus providing a network of new routes.

5.27 The North Billingham busway would provide a bus only link between the northern end of Marsh House Avenue and the A689. This together with similar links in Hartlepool will provide a useful route for public service vehicles from Stockton/Billingham to Hartlepool.


TR 8 Interactive Map

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH MIGHT PRECLUDE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SEGREGATED RIGHTS OF WAY FOR PASSENGER SERVICE VEHICLES ALONG THE FOLLOWING CORRIDORS:

(a.) HARDWICK TO OLD MIDDLESBROUGH ROAD VIA TEESDALE;

(b.) NORTH SHORE RAIL JUNCTION TO NORTON;

(c.) NORTH BILLINGHAM (MARSH HOUSE AVENUE TO A689).


Public Transport – Buses

5.28 A well developed and co-ordinated public transport system will improve access to facilities and services for a greater number of people, will cause less pollution and will represent a more efficient use of energy. The need for bus facilities in housing and industrial areas will be a priority. New large scale development will need to allow access for buses and appropriate places to stop.


TR 9 (No map)

NEW DEVELOPMENTS FOR HOUSING, EMPLOYMENT SHOPPING OR COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHOULD BE LOCATED AND DESIGNED TO ENABLE THE PROVISION AND CONVENIENT USE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICES.


Public Transport – Rail

5.29 The relationship between bus and rail travel should be closer than it is at present, to benefit passengers moving between towns within Cleveland. The Council and British Rail, will seek to secure an integrated rail and bus service to benefit both commuters and longer distance travellers. The Council will continue discussions with British Rail in order to press for improved rail services within the Borough.

5.30 A new station at Yarm in the Layfield Farm/Green Lane vicinity is in operation. In addition there is the possibility that the former station at Billingham could be re-opened: this is better related to the Town Centre. The Council is keen that both stations should be operational in the future.


TR 10 Interactive Map

A NEW RAILWAY STATION IS PROPOSED IMMEDIATELY TO THE NORTH OF GREEN LANE, YARM. ASSOCIATED CAR PARKING WILL BE PROVIDED ON LAND TO THE SOUTH 0F GREEN LANE.


5.31 The land corridors occupied by disused rail lines have great potential for reuse by people using other modes of transport, and as such are a valuable land resource. For example, the countryside section of the former Castle Eden line is now the focus of the well established and popular Castle Eden Walkway Country Park, whilst the urban section accommodates a combined footpath/cycleway. Many sections of disused rail lines within the Borough have been identified for future transport use by policies elsewhere in this Plan, e.g. for cycling, for walking (REC 7), for new roads (TR 13(a)) and as public transport route reservations (TR 8(b)). However, the remaining lengths of disused track, together with any routes that become redundant for rail transport during the plan period should be safeguarded for their value as development-free corridors of movement, from which future generations may benefit.


TR 11 (No map)

DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED IF IT IS LIKELY TO PREJUDICE THE FUTURE USE FOR TRANSPORT OF LAND ASSOCIATED WITH RAIL LINES WHICH ARE OR WHICH BECOME DISUSED.


OBJECTIVE 3

to maintain the commitment to planned road schemes, including the proper control of development affecting or affected by such schemes.

Provision of an Adequate Road Network

5.32 In order to alleviate existing transport problems, serve new development and meet future demands a number of new roads will be constructed and other highway improvements will be undertaken during the Plan period.

Trunk Road Proposals

A19(T) Widening:

5.33 In order to relieve congestion it is proposed to widen the A19 to a three lane dual carriageway north of the Tees viaduct as far as Billingham, and south of the viaduct as far as the Parkway junction. Work is programmed to start in early 1997 and finish by mid 1999.

A66(T), Long Newton Interchange

5.34 Concern has been expressed over the number of serious and fatal accidents which have occurred on the A66(T) particularly at the near junctions to Long Newton. In addition traffic in that area is expected to grow following improved links to Teesside Airport. The Department of Transport is proposing to construct a new junction with the A66(T) at the western end of the village and close off the existing road junctions. A link will also be provided between Longnewton and Elton for buses, local traffic, walkers and cyclists.


TR 12 Interactive Map

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR ANY DEVELOPMENT WHICH AFFECTS THE LINE OF THE FOLLOWING PROPOSED TRUNK ROAD IMPROVEMENT SCHEMES:

(a.) AI9(T) WIDENING;

(b.) A66(T) LONG NEWTON INTERCHANGE


Principal Roads

5.35 Consideration has been given to providing a bypass around Yarm. Following a feasibility study, an inner bypass around Yarm has been rejected but the Borough Council is still considering whether an outer bypass could be justified. There is also a commitment in the Cleveland Structure Plan to provide a principal road between Haverton Hill Road/Cowpen Bewley Road and the Seal Sands Road (A1185). However, the alignment would cross the International Nature Reserve so the proposal may not be implemented in its original form.

Thornaby Bypass

5.36 One of the most congested roads in the Borough is Thornaby Road (A1045). Growing volumes of commercial traffic from Teesside and Preston Farm Industrial Estates, together with residential traffic from Ingleby Barwick, combine to produce consistently high numbers of vehicles throughout the day.

5.37 To reduce congestion, particularly in the older parts of Thornaby, it is proposed to bypass the town. This will be achieved by extending the A174 dual carriageway westwards from the Parkway junction with the A19(T) to Thornaby Road. The route will pass to the north of Ingleby Barwick and cross the Tees to connect with the Bowesfield Industrial Estate, the A66(T) at Boathouse Lane, and Stockton Town Centre at Bridge Road. Construction in five phases is planned with works at Bowesfield already completed. Work on this project has first priority in the Council’s road building programme.

Portrack Lane Dualling

5.38 Portrack Lane is one of the major road links between Stockton, the AI9(T), and Middlesbrough, and serves industrial estates on both sides. The need to increase capacity through dualling has been recognised for many years and the central and eastern sections, which connect with the A19(T), are already complete. Work on the western section has yet to be programmed in detail, but is likely to be completed by mid 1997.

North Bank Gyratory System

5.39 Teesdale is now linked to the existing network on the west side of the River Tees by the Princess of Wales bridge. This crosses to Riverside (A1305) near its junction with Church Road at the northern end of Stockton town centre. To avoid congestion arising from new traffic associated with this development, the connection has been planned as part of a one-way gyratory road system linking Riverside – Maritime Road – Portrack Lane – Church Road.

Seaton Carew Road (All8), Seal Sands

5.40 It is proposed to widen the Seaton Carew Road, Seal Sands (A178). This will link up with a similar scheme to widen Tees Road in Hartlepool Borough. The scheme was approved by the County Council and is included in the Cleveland Structure Plan. However, it is likely to be a longer term proposal.

Morrison Street, Stillington

5.41 There is a proposal to change the alignment of Morrison Street, Stillington, in order to improve the approach to the railway bridge. However, this has not yet been included in the Transport Policies and Programme.


TR 13 Interactive Map

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR ANY DEVELOPMENT WHICH AFFECTS THE LINE OF THE FOLLOWING PROPOSED NEW HIGHWAYS AND IMPROVEMENT SCHEMES:

(a.) AI74 THORNABY BYPASS;

(b.) A1046 PORTRACK LANE DUALLlNG;

(c.) NORTH BANK GYRATORY SYSTEM;

(d.) SEATON CAREW ROAD (A178), SEAL SANDS;


OBJECTIVE 4

to support the provision of satisfactory roadside services in relation to major routes.

Roadside Service Areas

5.42 Except for informally serviced lay-bys, there are currently no drivers rest or petrol filling station facilities directly serving the A19 or A66 within the Borough. There is however a proposal for a petrol filling station and a motel adjoining the junction of the A19 and Coal Lane, Wolviston in the north of the Borough which has the benefit of outline planning consent, and the Council will support in principle the site’s development for such uses throughout the Plan period. The A66 in the west of the Borough is served by a petrol filling station and a petrol filling station/roadside restaurant located just within Darlington Borough.

5.43 Given this existing and proposed provision, and the intrusiveness of buildings and illumination associated with roadside service areas in the countryside, further such provision will only be considered within the built up area. Schemes must be designed to cause minimum disruption to users of adjoining property and should not detract from the character of the environment. It is essential that the Council’s highway standards are adhered to so that further access points on these roads are located safely. Any proposals including tourist accommodation, e.g. travellers lodges, will also be assessed against policy.


TR 14 (No map)

ROADSIDE SERVICES ON SITES ADJOINING THE A66 OR AI9 MAY BE PERMITTED PROVIDED THAT:

(i.) THE SITE IS LOCATED WITHIN THE LIMITS TO DEVELOPMENT; AND

(ii.) THERE IS NO ADVERSE IMPACT ON THE AMENITY OF ANY NEARBY RESIDENTS ARISING FROM THE MOVEMENT OF TRAFFIC TO AND FROM THE SITE AND ANY ILLUMINATION OF THE SITE; AND

(iii.) THERE IS NO ADVERSE IMPACT ON HIGHWAY SAFETY; AND

(iv.) BUILDINGS, PARKING AND OTHER FACILITIES CAN BE ACCOMMODATED ON THE SITE WITHOUT DETRIMENT TO THE CHARACTER OR APPEARANCE OF THE LOCALITY; AND

(v.) THE SITE IS NOT ALLOCATED FOR ANY OTHER USE.


OBJECTIVE 5

to ensure that new development has satisfactory standards of highway design and parking.

Highway Design and Parking

5.44 In order to ensure that all new development meets modern transport needs and does not cause environmental problems, the Borough Council will apply the car parking standards outlined in the Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council Design Guide & Specification, Edition No. 1, and will seek to negotiate provision for cyclists as set out in the proposed new Policy TR 6.

5.45 Where standards differentiate between central areas and non central areas, central area standards apply to the town centre of Stockton and the district centres of Thornaby and Billingham as identified on the Proposals Map.


TR 15 (No map)

THE DESIGN OF HIGHWAYS REQUIRED IN CONNECTION WITH NEW DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGES OF USE WILL PROVIDE FOR ALL THE TRAFFIC GENERATED BY THE DEVELOPMENT WHILE THE PROVISION OF OFF-STREET PARKING WILL NORMALLY BE REQUIRED TO ACCORD WITH THE STANDARDS SET OUT IN THE STOCKTON. ON-TEES BOROUGH COUNCIL DESIGN GUIDE & SPECIFICATION, EDITION NO. 1.


5.46 The continued prosperity of the town centres depends on the availability of convenient and attractive parking. In Stockton Town Centre, the Council provides a range of sites, and the Castlegate Centre operates a multi-storey car park. Parking is also proposed as part of the redevelopment scheme referred to in SH 1. Further provision will be limited to that required for the operational needs of development only, to prevent congestion where such car parks egress onto main roads and to allow the Local Highway Authority to exercise effective traffic management. The need for any further provision beyond this will be monitored and assessed as part of a review of traffic management in and around the town centre as a whole. Paragraphs 5.13–5.21 set out the Council’s commitment to improve cycle parking facilities at the town centres and other locations.


TR 16 (No map)

WITHIN STOCKTON TOWN CENTRE, THE PROVISION OF NON OPERATIONAL PRIVATE CAR PARKING WILL NOT NORMALLY BE PERMITTED.


5.47 At Billingham and Thornaby town centres, there is adequate car parking to meet the needs of both businesses in the town centres and visitors to them. Improvements to the car park at Thornaby were carried out in 1991 to make it more attractive.


TR 17 Interactive Map

CAR PARKING ON MORE THAN ONE LEVEL IS PROPOSED AS PART OF THE COMPREHENSIVE SHOPPING DEVELOPMENT AT THE REAR OF THE HIGH STREET, STOCKTON.


5.48 In Stockton town centre there is the opportunity to provide more than service level car parking as part of the redevelopment proposals referred to in Policy SH 1. There may be a need for further car parking adjacent to the town centre and the demand for this will be monitored.

5.49 In addition there is a need to review the overall management of traffic around the town centre. This is being assessed in conjunction with the development scheme in this area and proposals will be devised accordingly.

5.50 At Yarm, there is a demand for more long stay parking to service town centre businesses. The main opportunity for providing extra parking is through the inclusion of extra spaces for public use within the redevelopment of underused sites to the rear of the High Street. To allow otherwise acceptable schemes to go ahead, the Council may be prepared to accept payment towards the cost of providing spaces nearby if it considers that it is practicable to do so. This arrangement would be the subject of a legal agreement between the developer and the local authority. The Council will ensure that any parking to be provided is convenient and is provided within a reasonable time.


TR 18 (No map)

IN YARM TOWN CENTRE, THE COUNCIL WILL CONSIDER RELIEVING APPLICANTS OF SATISFYING STANDARDS FOR CAR PARKING IN EXCHANGE FOR A COMMUTED PAYMENT


5.51 This scheme may also be used to satisfy parking arrangements for conversion of large dwellings for other forms of residential accommodation where the provision of parking within the site would be visually intrusive. In these circumstances it may be more appropriate to provide parking bays within the highway rather than within the site. The Council will investigate the practicality of using this approach in residential areas in the Borough.

OBJECTIVE 6

to support the maintenance and improvement of rail and port facilities for carrying freight.

Provision of Rail Facilities

5.52 In Cleveland, the existing freightliner depot at Wilton is likely to become the regional depot for Channel Tunnel trains. Within the Borough, the Council wishes to see more freight carried by rail or sea, to reduce the growth in noisy and polluting road haulage. To this end, paragraph 3.14 of the Industry section lists sites which are directly adjacent to rail lines or to navigable deep water, where warehousing and distribution could operate more sustainably. In addition, provision is rail access to Seal Sands, to assist in the movement of bulk petrochemical loads. The Council is also keen to prevent the loss of rail sidings and their links to the rail network which serve existing major industrial complexes such as at Teesmouth, ICI Billingham, the Royal Naval Stores depot and Thompson’s Scrapyard.


TR 19 Interactive Map

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR ANY DEVELOPMENT WHICH AFFECTS THE LINE OF THE PROPOSED LINKING RAIL TRACK BETWEEN SEAL SANDS AND GRAYTHORPE


TR 20 (No map)

THE COUNCIL WILL RESIST DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD RESULT IN THE LOSS OF RAILWAY SIDINGS OR SEVER THEM FROM THE RAILWAY SYSTEM.


Teesmouth

5.53 The potential of deep water in the River Tees to move goods by sea should be safeguarded by protecting frontages from inappropriate development. land has been reserved under Policy IN 3 to be used for port-related development. This is likely to require channels, jetties and loading facilities as well as transport links on the landward side.

5.54 The port company itself has no plans at present to develop the port resource on the northern bank of the River Tees.

OBJECTIVE 7

to support the maintenance and development of Teesside Airport.

Teesside Airport

5.55 Teesside Airport lies partly in Stockton Borough although the main terminal buildings are in Darlington. Road access to the Airport is not good, though significant improvement; have been made recently with the A67 being re-routed to bypass low railway bridges. Construction of an improved A66(T) junction to the west of Longnewton may encourage some Airport users to travel via the C140 road for which improvements may be proposed during the period of the Plan.

5.56 The rail halt for Teesside Airport is poorly sited ending about half a kilometre from the main terminal building. Unfortunately there is little potential to improve this.

5.57 Aircraft and passenger movements at Teesside Airport have grown steadily and the Airport has sufficient capacity to allow foreseeable growth. There are large areas of surplus land at the Airport which are not likely to be required for operational or ‘margin of safety’ purposes. Consideration is being giver, to a range of appropriate alternative uses for this land, for example as a motor sports centre or for aviation related business. In general the Airport represents an important asset to Teesside and the Council will protect the Airport from any development that would interfere with its operation through consultation on development within safeguarded areas. The Council will also sympathetically view development proposal~; which would help secure the long term future operation of the Airport. Consideration will need to be given to the construction of a new access road on the land to the south of the runway should development proposals be formulated. The need to protect an area 1OOOft to the north-east of the runway will also need to be considered in aligning the road.


TR 21 Interactive Map

PLANNING PERMISSION MAY BE GRANTED AT TEESSIDE AIRPORT FOR B1 AND B2 USES RELATED TO AVIATION OR FOR THE OPERATIONAL NEEDS OF THE AIRPORT PROVIDED THAT:-

(i.) THE DEVELOPMENT DOES NOT HARM THE NATURE CONSERVATION INTEREST OF THE AREA; AND

(ii.) SUBSTANTIAL LANDSCAPING IS INCORPORATED TO SCREEN AND INTEGRATE NEW DEVELOPMENT; AND

(iii.) IT CAN BE SHOWN THAT THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT GIVE RISE TO AN AMOUNT OF TRAFFIC WHICH WOULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE AMENITY OF RESIDENTS IN NEARBY VILLAGES OR EAGLESCLIFFE.


5.58 There are two distinct development areas at Teesside Airport within the Stockton-on-Tees Borough boundary. The northern area is immediately available for development as shown on the Proposals Map. The southern area is the subject of a feasibility study and will be considered for inclusion at the first review of the Local Plan.

5.59 Examples of airport-related uses referred to in Policy TR 21 include fire training school, air freight handling and storage, mail handling and sorting, travel agency, conference hotel facilities, aircraft servicing and training centre.


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