Stockton-on-Tees Local Plan Apr 1991 – Mar 2006

Development

Housing

Introduction

4.1 The Borough Council aims to ensure that all its residents have a decent home. This comprises a whole range of activities ranging from identifying land suitable for new building to the repair and modernisation of the existing housing stock.

4.2 The role of the Borough Council in housing matters has changed over the past 15 years. The Council is now less involved in providing houses itself than in working with other agencies – private, public and voluntary – to ensure a high standard of housing.

4.3 Many current housing initiatives in the Borough are taking place under the umbrella of Single Regeneration Budget and City Challenge. Both are schemes promoted by central government to tackle some of the worst housing areas. They include improvement of rundown housing, building new dwellings and offering some local authority housing either for sale or to be managed by a housing association.

4.4 Housing Renewal Areas have recently been introduced as a way of dealing with rundown private housing areas in a comprehensive manner.

4.5 A particular concern of this Plan is to ensure that the potential of underused or derelict land within the urban area of the Borough is examined for housing before extending the limits to development. In a similar manner many existing buildings have scope for conversion to meet a variety of residential needs, for example as flats or residential care homes. These include large houses which may be considered too large for single family occupation, or the underused upper floors of commercial premises in some town centres.

Policy Context

Regional Planning Guidance

4.6 Regional Planning Guidance estimates that 14,000 new houses will be required in Cleveland between 1991 and 2006.

Structure Plan

4.7 The main role of the Structure Plan on the topic of housing is to identify a requirement for new dwellings in the Borough during the Plan period, and to indicate the general locations which are likely to supply this target. Structure Plan Alteration Number 1 was adopted in November 1995. It suggests that 6,700 additional dwellings will be required in Stockton between April 1992 and April 2006.

Local Plan Objectives

4.8 Housing policy in the Local Plan has been based on the current Structure Plan strategy of development taking place within established development limits. Redevelopment of derelict sites for new housing, coupled with the revitalisation of housing stock and environmental improvement of residential neighbourhoods, will assist in urban regeneration. The Plan seeks to avoid use of land for housing in the open countryside, in the green wedges, or on important open spaces in urban areas. By this means, policies to maintain and enhance environmental conditions are assisted and sustainable development is encouraged.

OBJECTIVES

Housing Objectives

OBJECTIVE 1

to ensure that there is an adequate supply of land available to meet the whole range of housing needs throughout the Plan period.

Dwelling Requirement and Supply

4.9 The dwelling requirement for the Plan period is assumed to be 6,700, the figure identified in the Structure Plan Alteration. The figures used in the calculation of housing supply are based on the position at April 1993 and are set out in Table 1 on the following page. The various elements of supply are itemised below:

The large sites which have been granted permission are listed in Policy HO 1.

4.10 A number of other elements also contribute to supply:

In total this comes to a further 1130 dwellings, resulting in a surplus of 1,405 (1,130 + 275) over the requirement.

4.11 The numbers of planning permissions that are granted for small sites, or for conversion of buildings (or for demolition of buildings and re-build of additional dwellings on the cleared site), varies from year to year. In 1994 planning consents were issued for 77 small sites, and 31 conversions, whilst in 1995 there were 56 small sites and 16 conversions. These numbers are similar to previous years, but it should be borne in mind that not all small sites will necessarily be built. Although it is possible that in the Plan period there may be some reduction in opportunities arising, evidence of recent experience suggests this has not yet happened.

New Allocations

4.12 The housing supply is dominated by one large site, Ingleby Barwick, which is expected to supply 4,280 dwellings over the Plan period or about 3,250 from 1997. Despite there being a surplus of dwellings over the requirement, the Council considers that it is appropriate to identify further sites throughout the Borough to offer a greater choice of location. A number of additional large sites are therefore allocated for residential development and these are listed in Policy HO 2. These are expected to result in a total of 679 (316 from 1997) dwellings. The Council does not consider that any release of land to the west of Stockton is required. All of the sites identified lie within the proposed limits to development of the urban areas, or the villages, and can be developed without causing undue harm to amenity or other local interests. It may be seen from the figures under the 1997 position that several have subsequently been developed.

4.13 Wynyard Estate was granted planning permission in 1991 for a mixed business park, housing and leisure development. It includes 455 ‘executive’ dwellings. Given the exceptional setting of the development near the urban areas of the Borough, it is not considered necessary to identify further sites for this type of housing.

4.14 As shown on Table 1, the total supply until 2006 amounts to 8,904, as against a requirement of 6,700, resulting in a surplus of 2,204 dwellings.


HO 1 Interactive Map

THE FOLLOWING EXlSTING COMMITMENTS TO RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ARE REAFFIRMED:*

PositionNo. Dwellings**Area (ha)1997
BILLINGHAM
(a) BULLGARTH300.530
(b) HIGH GRANGE47025.1280
(c) HIGH GRANGE EXTENSION202.60
(d) THE GREEN200.40
INGLEBY BARWICK
(e) VILLAGE 3118059.0300
(f) VILLAGES 4-63100178.82950
NORTON
(g) MARSHALLS MONO1206.0120
(h) SOUTH ROAD150.715
(j) STATION ROAD250.50
REDMARSHALL
(k) HIGH FARM101.410
STOCKTON
(l) GREEN LANE301.815
(m) OXBRIDGE LANE200.80
(n) QUEEN’S PARK501.20
(p) SHERATON SCHOOL1204.142
THORNABY
(q) WESTBURY STREET200.40
WYNYARD
(r) WYNYARD PARK60591.0400
YARM
(s) ATLAS SKINNERY751.10
(t) CATTLE MARKET300.70
5940376.14162

FOOTNOTES:

* THE EXPRESSION ‘RE-AFFIRMED’ MEANS THAT PLANNING PERMISSIONS WILL BE RENEWED IN THE ABSENCE OF CHANGED PLANNING CIRCUMSTANCES.

** ALL FIGURES IN POLICY HO 1 ARE ROUNDED TO THE NEAREST 5.


TABLE 1 : DWELLING REQUIREMENT AND SUPPLY
1997 Position
DWELLING REQUIREMENT1992-20066700(6700)
 
Unimplemented permissions (large sites)at April 199359404162
Unimplemented permissions (small sites)at April 1993120-
Dwellings under construction*at April 19931035Estimated 678
CompletionsApril 1992-April 1993480*
April 1993-April 19972956*
Allowance for unidentified small sites (30 per annum)April 1993-April 2006390
April 1997-April 2006270
Allowance for conversions and changes of use (20 per annum)April 1993-April 2006260
April 1997-April 2006180
Proposed development on new large sitesApril 1993-April 2006679316
 
TOTAL SUPPLY89045606**

* includes all dwellings on sites where development has commenced.

** figure reflects remaining supply but including dwellings under construction.


HO 2 Interactive Map

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IS PROPOSED ON THE FOLLOWING NEW SITES:

PositionNo. DwellingsArea (ha)1997
BILLINGHAM
(a.) HIGH GRANGE AVENUE301.230
HILTON
(b.) FALCON WALK151.215
KIRKLEVINGTON
(c.) FOREST LANE252.325
LONGNEWTON
(d.) COMMUNITY CENTRE100.710
STOCKTON
(e.) DARLINGTON LANE16511.1165
(f.) ELM TREE401.90
(g.) PARLIAMENT STREET350.40
(h.) PRIMROSE HILL SCHOOL SITE, DURHAM ROAD401.00
(j.) ROPNER TRUST SITE1002.00
(k.) SPARKS BAKERY852.00
THORNABY
(l.) REDCAR ROAD400.70
(m.) SHACKLETON CLOSE300.70
YARM
(n.) CHALLONER ROAD121.20
ADDITIONAL SITES
(q.) CARLTON VILLAGE201.120
(r.) NORTHCOTE HILL FARM NORTON71.67
(s.) ALLENSWAY, THORNABY251.125
(t.) BRAEWORTH CLOSE, YARM190.819
TOTAL69831.0316

Development on Unallocated Sites

4.15 Within the Limits to Development there may be opportunities for small scale residential development on land which is not allocated for any other purpose. It is important that any proposals for infill development are sympathetic to the character of the locality. They must take account of any attractive features on the site and incorporate these where possible. In some villages dense infilling is unlikely to be appropriate since their character often comes from the presence of large gardens, paddocks, village greens and other open space areas. However, higher density may be required if the traditional village or urban form is tight knit. The Council also wishes to restrict new residential development underneath electricity lines on account of the detrimental effect on the amenity of residents, and the possible effect on health.


HO 3 (No map)

WITHIN THE LIMITS OF DEVELOPMENT RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT MAY BE PERMITTED PROVIDED THAT:

(i.) THE LAND IS NOT SPECIFICALLY ALLOCATED FOR ANOTHER USE; AND

(ii.) THE LAND IS NOT UNDERNEATH ELECTRICITY LINES; AND

(iii.) IT DOES NOT RESULT IN THE LOSS OF A SITE WHICH IS USED FOR RECREATIONAL PURPOSES; AND

(iv.) IT IS SYMPATHETIC TO THE CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY AND TAKES ACCOUNT OF AND ACCOMMODATES IMPORTANT FEATURES WITHIN THE SITE; AND

(v.) IT DOES NOT RESULT IN AN UNACCEPTABLE LOSS OF AMENITY TO ADJACENT LAND USERS; AND

(vi.) SATISFACTORY ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE FOR ACCESS AND PARKING.


OBJECTIVE 2

to meet the needs of the community for specific types of housing.

Affordable Housing

4.16 Changing economic conditions have made it increasingly difficult for those on low income to obtain a dwelling either by purchase or to rent.

4.17 While there is some evidence that this is a problem in Stockton, a full survey is required to provide information on this aspect of housing need.

4.18 The main need is likely to be in the urban area. Where shortages are identified, the Council will seek to achieve a certain amount of affordable housing as part of larger scale developments. As part of the overall development of the major centre area at Ingleby Barwick the Council will support an element of Housing Association development. In general, the amount of affordable housing required on large sites will be subject to negotiation and agreement between the Authority and the developer in the light of local housing circumstances and the results of the survey.

4.19 The rural parts of the Borough are sufficiently close to the town to enable many of those who work in the countryside to travel from the town. Permission may also be granted in exceptional cases for low-cost housing in rural areas on land adjoining the settlement limits. As with affordable housing in urban areas this depends on need being demonstrated, and satisfactory arrangements being made for the benefits to be enjoyed by future occupiers. This would normally be through the control of a Housing Association or a Trust.


HO 4 (No map)

IN HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS EXCEEDING 2 HECTARES (5 ACRES), AFFORDABLE HOUSING SHALL BE PROVIDED TO AN EXTENT AGREED BETWEEN THE COUNCIL AND THE DEVELOPER AS APPROPRIATE TO HELP MEET ANY LOCAL NEED. THERE SHALL BE ARRANGEMENTS TO ENSURE THAT THE BENEFITS WILL BE PASSED ON TO SUBSEQUENT, AS WELL AS INITIAL, OCCUPIERS.


HO 5 (No map)

EXCEPTIONALLY; PLANNING PERMISSION MAY BE GRANTED FOR SMALL-SCALE, LOW COST HOUSING ON LAND ADJOINING THE LIMITS TO DEVELOPMENT THAT WOULD NOT NORMALLY BE RELEASED FOR DEVELOPMENT IF:

(i.) IF CAN BE DEMONSTRATED THAT THERE IS A NEED FOR LOW-COST HOUSING IN THAT LOCATION; AND

(ii.) THERE ARE ARRANGEMENTS TO ENSURE THAT THE BENEFITS Will BE PASSED ON TO SUBSEQUENT, AS WELL AS INITIAL, OCCUPIERS.


4.20 Many substantial dwellings first intended for large families are now expensive to run and difficult to maintain by a single family. These properties may be suitable for conversion to flats or bedsits. This may prove an appropriate means of securing their future whilst adding variety to the housing stock. Uses within Class C2 (residential institutions) may also be acceptable in large detached properties.

4.21 Many large terraced dwellings have already been converted to flats and bedsits, particularly in the Parkfield area of Stockton. Large concentrations of such uses can change the entire character of an area, and the Council would wish to guard against this. Proper consideration is also required to ensure the conversions do not lead to:


HO 6 (No map)

WITHIN BUILT UP AREAS PROPOSALS FOR THE CONVERSION OF LARGE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES TO FLATS AND BEDSITS WILL NORMALLY BE PERMITTED PROVIDED THAT:

(i.) THERE WOULD BE NO ADVERSE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY OF NEIGHBOURS; AND

(ii.) CONVERSION WOULD NOT HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER AND APPEARANCE OF THE BUILDING OR AREA; AND

(iii.) ADEQUATE PROVISION CAN BE MADE FOR ACCESS AND THE PARKING OF VEHICLES IN A MANNER WHICH SAFEGUARDS THE VISUAL AMENITY OF THE AREA. IN CERTAIN CASES, NORMAL PARKING STANDARDS MAY BE RELAXED TO TAKE ACCOUNT OF THE LIKELY RATE OF CAR OWNERSHIP AMONGST OCCUPANTS.


In addition, conversion of large detached dwellings to Class C2 uses (residential institutions) will normally be acceptable subject to the above criteria.

Gypsies

4.22 Following the enactment of the ‘Criminal justice and Public Order Act 1994’ it is likely increasing numbers of planning applications for the provision of private gypsy sites will be received. The Policy set out below will be applied by the Local Planning Authority in considering such applications.


HO 7 (No map)

PROPOSALS FOR GYPSY SITES WILL NOT BE PERMITTED IN AREAS IDENTIFIED AS SITES OF SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC INTEREST, NATIONAL NATURE RESERVES, LOCAL NATURE RESERVES, SITES OF NATURE CONSERVATION IMPORTANCE, SPECIAL LANDSCAPE AREAS OR ANCIENT WOODLAND.

IN ADDITION SITES FOR GYPSIES WILL NOT BE PERMITTED ON LAND SPECIFICALLY ALLOCATED FOR OTHER DEVELOPMENT.

ELSEWHERE IN CONSIDERING PROPOSALS FOR GYPSY SITES THE COUNCIL WILL PAY PARTICULAR REGARD TO THE FOLLOWING FACTORS:-

(i.) THE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY OF ADJACENT PROPERTY THROUGH, FOR EXAMPLE, NOISE, DUST, SMELL, SMOKE;

(ii.) THE EFFECT ON THE DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL OF ADJACENT LAND;

(iii.) THE EFFECT ON THE APPEARANCE OF THE SURROUNDINGS;

(iv.) SITES ARE NOT ISOLATED FROM LOCAL FACILITIES;

(v.) TRAFFIC GENERATION AND ACCESS REQUIREMENTS.


Housing for Special Needs

4.23 A special needs housing survey has been prepared. The ‘Care in the Community’ legislation requires consideration to be given to the special requirements of different groups suffering disability or disadvantage. New care homes should generally be located in mainly residential areas and be within walking distance of local facilities. The building should be designed to complement its surroundings and have no adverse effect upon neighbouring properties. In certain instances where rural dereliction may be obviated, a location away from the built up area may be acceptable. There may be circumstances which would enable such development to take place in a commercial area.


HO 8 (No map)

PROPOSALS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CLASS C2 USES (RESIDENTIAL INSTITUTIONS) WILL NORMALLY BE PERMITTED PROVIDED THAT:

(i.) THE PROPERTY IS LOCATED WITHIN A MAINLY RESIDENTIAL AREA WITHIN EASY REACH OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT, SHOPPING AND OTHER COMMUNITY FACILITIES; AND

(ii.) THE DESIGN OF THE DEVELOPMENT COMPLEMENTS ITS SURROUNDINGS AND CAN PROVIDE AN ATTRACTIVE OUTLOOK WITH SECURE AND SHELTERED SITTING AREAS; AND

(iii.) THE DEVELOPMENT WILL HAVE NO ADVERSE EFFECT UPON NEIGHBOURING PROPERTIES; AND

(iv.) ADEQUATE ACCESS AND SPACE FOR PARKING AND SERVICING CAN BE ACCOMMODATED WITHIN THE SITE WITHOUT CAUSING UNDUE DISTURBANCE.


Dwellings for People with Disabilities

4.24 One of the aims of the Plan is to maximise accessibility for all throughout the Borough. The provision of dwellings which are able to be used by people with disabilities is one way of meeting this aim. The Council’s role in providing housing has decreased significantly in recent years, and so responsibility for providing housing opportunities for all, including those with special housing requirements, must be shared with the private sector.

4.25 New housing can be designed to be suitable for visitors in wheelchairs and capable of adaptation to suit most people with disabilities. This will enable them to live as independently as possible in the community. If an increasing proportion of the general housing stock is designed to a standard which makes this possible it will allow people with disabilities more choice of housing. It will make it increasingly unnecessary for people to move if they become less mobile, and will reduce Council expenditure on costly adaptations when people become disabled. Such housing need cost no more to construct than ordinary housing.

4.26 The Council is currently researching the housing needs of people with disabilities and, following consultations with their representatives, will set standards for new housing in relation to the needs of people with disabilities.

OBJECTIVE 3

to maintain and improve the existing housing stock.

Background

4.27 While new development will be important in providing for housing requirements, the existing stock will continue to supply accommodation for a wide range of needs. It is essential that as properties age, they do not deteriorate to the point at which demolition is necessary. Standards need to be improved and amenities provided to keep pace with the changing aspirations of society. Slum clearance is no longer of significance in the Authority’s housing programme, but there are indications that levels of maintenance and repair in both public and private housing are now under considerable pressure. A clear view is therefore needed of the balance to be struck between replacement of the older housing stock and its continuous upgrading.

Private Housing

4.28 In the past the use of General Improvement Area and Housing Action Area powers targeted at older housing areas led to significant improvements to residential neighbourhoods. Whilst there has been success with older housing, it is now evident that the younger stock of housing also faces decline if it is unpopular with residents.

4.29 To establish the extent of the problem, a Housing Condition Survey has been undertaken. Approximately 5.5% of the entire private sector housing stock has been found to be unfit. In addition 3.1% of the stock has been judged to be borderline (at May 1996).

4.30 In view of the impending enactment of new housing legislation, a review of the private sector housing strategy will be necessary. This may lead to changes in policy with regard to such matters as remedying unfitness; preventing further decline of the stock; meeting the needs of the disabled; enforcement services; improving particular local areas and energy efficiency. For the moment however attention will continue to be focussed on North Thornaby (Mandale and Victoria Wards) since this area is identified as suffering most from poorer housing conditions without as yet receiving assistance.


HO 9 Interactive Map

A RENEWAL AREA WILL BE DESIGNATED AT NORTH THORNABY.


Local Authority Housing

4.31 A successful bid under the City Challenge initiative and a continuing programme under the Single Regeneration Budget have given the Council more scope to maintain and improve its own housing in the City Challenge area.

4.32 Partnerships between the local authority, the private sector, housing associations and residents will lead to selective demolition, new construction, environmental changes, a mixed tenure and varied accommodation.

4.33 Schemes are proceeding at Blue Hall, Queen’s Park, Tilery, Portrack and Victoria House/St. James House, and will include the following elements:


HO 10 Interactive Map

WITHIN THE AREA OF THE CITY CHALLENGE INITIATIVE THE FOLLOWING AREAS WILL BE THE SUBJECT OF SCHEMES INVOLVING SELECTIVE DEMOLITION, REDEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT:

(a.) BLUE HALL (NOW RENAMED NORTON GRANGE);

(b.) QUEENS PARK;

(c.) TILERY AND PORTRACK;

(d.) VICTORIA ESTATE;

(e.) RAGWORTH


4.34 Within the City Challenge area, particularly the central area, there is a shortage of accommodation for the elderly, the single and young families in dwellings other than terraced houses. While some of the initiatives described above, and to which Policy HO 9 refers, are intended to redress this balance in particular areas, other schemes are proposed which will provide more choice of dwelling type. These include:

OBJECTIVE 4

to ensure a high standard of building design in new and extended dwellings.

Design and Layout

4.35 It is important that new housing development makes a positive contribution to the environment. The Council seeks a high standard of built environment for the benefit both of existing and future residents. Housing schemes should take account of existing features on the site in order to achieve an individual character.

4.36 In the case of larger sites identified for residential development, the Council will prepare development briefs to indicate the type of development it wishes to see. Intending developers are encouraged to seek advice from the Council’s Planning Division.

4.37 The success of any development depends partly on the arrangement of outdoor space. Informal amenity space can enhance the appearance of a development. However it must form an integral part of the housing layout. For larger developments the Council will use the National Playing Fields Association standard of 2.46ha per 1000 population as a guideline to assess the requirements for outdoor playing space, such as football pitches, until it develops its own standard based on a local survey.


HO 11 (No map)

NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SHOULD BE DESIGNED AND LAID OUT TO:

(i.) PROVIDE A HIGH QUALITY OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT WHICH IS IN KEEPING WITH ITS SURROUNDINGS;

(ii.) INCORPORATE OPEN SPACE FOR BOTH FORMAL AND INFORMAL USE;

(iii.) ENSURE THAT RESIDENTS OF THE NEW DWELLINGS WOULD HAVE A SATISFACTORY DEGREE OF PRIVACY AND AMENITY;

(iv.) AVOID ANY UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE PRIVACY AND AMENITY OF THE OCCUPIERS OF NEARBY PROPERTIES;

(v.) PAY DUE REGARD TO EXISTING FEATURES AND GROUND LEVELS ON THE SITE;

(vi.) PROVIDE ADEQUATE ACCESS, PARKING AND SERVICING;

(vii.) SUBJECT TO THE ABOVE FACTORS, TO INCORPORATE FEATURES TO ASSIST IN CRIME PREVENTION.


Extensions and Other Domestic Development

4.38 Householders often wish to extend their homes as an alternative to moving house. The Council wishes to ensure that any alterations are sympathetic to the character of the original dwelling and the immediate area, and also respect the amenities of nearby properties.

4.39 Two-storey side extensions should not cause or risk the creation of a terraced effect by filling the gap between dwellings. This may be achieved either by setting the extension back from a common boundary, normally by a distance of 1m, or alternatively by setting it back from the front wall of the dwelling. This latter option would limit the extent of continuous frontage and roof line, thereby reducing the mass of the building. The required set-back to achieve the intended effect would be likely to be around 2m.

4.40 Rear extensions can be particularly obtrusive and overbearing in their impact on neighbours. Experience suggests that a projection of about 3m offers a reasonable compromise between the need for space by the applicant and an acceptable impact on the neighbour.

4.41 Extensions may give a degree of independence to elderly or disabled relatives, whilst ensuring that help is at hand when needed. These extensions will often create no planning problems. However, few domestic plots are suitable for the creation of a further, separate dwelling and such extensions should therefore be designed so that they can easily become used as part of the original property.


HO 12 (No map)

WHERE PLANNING PERMISSION IS REQUIRED, ALL EXTENSIONS TO DWELLINGS SHOULD BE IN KEEPING WITH THE PROPERTY AND THE STREET SCENE IN TERMS OF STYLE, PROPORTION AND MATERIALS AND SHOULD AVOID SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF PRIVACY AND AMENITY FOR THE RESIDENTS OF NEIGHBOURING PROPERTIES.

PERMISSION FOR TWO-STOREY REAR EXTENSIONS CLOSE TO A COMMON BOUNDARY WILL NOT NORMALLY BE GRANTED IF THE EXTENSION WOULD SHADOW OR DOMINATE NEIGHBOURING PROPERTY TO A SUBSTANTIAL DEGREE.

PERMISSION FOR TWO-STOREY SIDE EXTENSIONS CLOSE TO A COMMON BOUNDARY WILL NOT NORMALLY BE GRANTED UNLESS THEY ARE SET BACK FROM THE BOUNDARY OR SET BACK FROM THE FRONT WALL OF THE DWELLING.


HO 13 (No map)

EXTENSIONS TO DWELLINGS TO PROVIDE ACCOMMODATION FOR DEPENDENT RELATIVES SHOULD BE DESIGNED TO BE USED AS PART OF THE MAIN DWELLING WHEN NO LONGER REQUIRED FOR THAT PURPOSE.



Community and Education Facilities

Background

4.42 The Council recognises the importance of community and education provision to local communities and wishes to ensure that its location, scale and range continues to reflect the needs of the Borough’s population over the next 10 years.

OBJECTIVE

to improve access to a range of community and education facilities.


Community Facilities

4.43 Within the inner urban area, City Challenge Funding will be used to create strong new bases for community life, through the conversion of redundant and underused buildings, and to improve the facilities at existing centres, e.g. the International Family Centre, Stockton.

4.44 A number of these schemes include the provision of employment advice and training within communities and have been dealt with at paragraphs 3.26–3.28 of the Industry Section and Policies IN 11, IN 12 and IN 13. The provision of childcare facilities is also being promoted in the City Challenge area to increase the opportunities for women to return to work, as part of multi purpose community facilities, e.g. at Tilery Primary School, the former Richard Hind School, Yarm Road; the Leven Road Youth Training Centre, Norton and at the former YMCA, Stockton Town Centre.

4.45 A site has been identified for a doctor’s surgery at Alma Street, Stockton. This is a replacement for the surgery in Hume House as this block of flats is due to be refurbished.

4.46 Beyond the City Challenge area, the provision of new community facilities is concentrated on Ingleby Barwick, where there is a commitment to a substantial new housing development (see Policy HO 1). land has been identified within which a health centre, two churches and a community library may be provided, alongside a park and shops (see Policies REC 4 and SH 16). In addition, a new social centre in Yarm is proposed on the site of the existing building at Bentley Wynd.

4.47 In the rural areas, the value of village halls is recognised, both for general community use, and as sporting venues (see paragraph 4.90 Recreation section). The Council will support local efforts to provide a wider range of community facilities in the villages. Wherever appropriate, in association with large scale developments, the Council will seek contributions from developers towards the cost of providing community facilities.


COMM 1 Interactive Map

CHILDCARE FACILITIES WILL BE PROVIDED THROUGH THE ADAPTATION OF PARTS OF THE FOLLOWING BUILDINGS:

(a.) FORMER YMCA, STOCKTON TOWN CENTRE;

(b.) TILERY PRIMARY SCHOOL, STOCKTON;

(c.) FORMER RICHARD HIND SCHOOL, STOCKTON;

(d.) LEVEN ROAD YOUTH TRAINING CENTRE, NORTON


COMM 2 Interactive Map

A SITE IS IDENTIFIED FOR A REPLACEMENT DOCTOR’S SURGERY AT ALMA STREET, STOCKTON.


COMM 3 Interactive Map

SITES ARE RESERVED WITHIN THE MAJOR CENTRE AT INGLEBY BARWICK FOR THE FOLLOWING:

(a.) HEALTH CENTRE;

(b.) ANGLICAN CHURCH;

(c.) CATHOLIC CHURCH AND PRESBYTERY;

(d.) COMMUNITY LIBRARY.


COMM 4 Interactive Map

THE REPLACEMENT OF YARM SOCIAL CENTRE, BENTLEY WYND, WITH A NEW COMMUNITY FACILITY WILL BE SUPPORTED.


Education

4.48 The current provision of education facilities within the Borough is generally adequate to meet existing and future needs. One exception is Ingleby Barwick where a further primary school will be provided to meet the needs of new housing development. land for a secondary school and for a further primary school will also be reserved there to allow for their possible construction towards the end of the Plan period. A replacement for Oxbridge lane County Primary School on land is also intended to the south of Grangefield Secondary School. Yarm School is situated on the Friarage site to the south of Yarm town centre. The majority of the site lies within the Yarm Conservation Area and a number of buildings within the site are listed. The school has proposals to extend the range of education facilities it offers which is likely to require the development of additional buildings. The Council would not be averse to further built development on the site subject to development proposals satisfying the relevant policies of the Plan, including Policies EN 24, EN 25, EN 26, EN 27 and EN 28.

4.49 In the higher education sector, the opening of Phase 1 of University College Stockton in 1992 has created a growing demand for student accommodation in the inner area of Stockton. Provision for approximately 300 students has been constructed at Teesdale, Thornaby but land is reserved for future development of the university and ancillary facilities adjacent to the existing site and to the north of the river at Portrack.


ED 1 Interactive Map

THE PRIMARY SCHOOL WILL BE EXTENDED ON LAND AT THE MAJOR CENTRE AREA, INGLEBY BARWICK.


ED 2 Interactive Map

LAND IS RESERVED FOR NEW PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:

(a.) THE RINGS, INGLEBY BARWICK

(b.) TO THE SOUTH OF GRANGEFIELD SECONDARY SCHOOL PLAYING FIELDS, STOCKTON.


ED 3 Interactive Map

AN EIGHT HECTARE SITE IS RESERVED FOR A SECONDARY SCHOOL WITHIN THE MAJOR CENTRE AREA, INGLEBY BARWICK.


ED 4 Interactive Map

LAND IS RESERVED ON TEESDALE, THORNABY AND AT PORTRACK FOR THE EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE AND ANCILLARY FACILITIES.



Recreation

Introduction

4.50 Growing numbers of people are taking part in sport or recreation activities for enjoyment, and for their health and well-being. This has created an increasing demand for a wide range of specialist facilities, both indoor and outdoor, and a need to retain accessible areas of public space for informal quiet recreation, and for organised sport. The protection and enhancement of existing facilities and the provision of new opportunities will benefit residents and increase the attractiveness of the Borough to visitors and investors.

4.51 In view of funding constraints the Borough Council has limited ability to provide new recreation facilities. There are other ways by which the quality and range of recreation in the Borough can be improved, for example:

Policy Context

4.52 The Council is currently preparing a district wide sports and recreation strategy which is primarily concerned with improving the overall quality of life through:

4.53 The Council has also contributed to a county wide recreational strategy which is primarily concerned with countryside recreation. However, there is a need to undertake further studies of recreation patterns within the Borough before standards can be adopted which are sensitive to local needs. The Local Plan provides a framework for these studies.

Recreation Objectives

4.54 The Council will pursue the following objectives:

OBJECTIVES

OBJECTIVE 1

to ensure that the quantity and quality of outdoor playing space and informal open space meets the needs of the community.

Outdoor Playing Space

4.55 Within the Borough there is a deficiency of open space for active play according to the standards of the National Playing Fields Association. Their target of 2.46 hectares for each 1,000 population includes Borough Council facilities, those under the control of the Education Authority which are also used by the community, and privately owned facilities. Almost every ward in Stockton Borough falls well short of this figure.

4.56 The Council will undertake further studies of the use of playing fields in order to derive locally sensitive standards for playing fields. Such standards will be used to identify where it is necessary to provide new playing fields, and to guard against the loss of playing fields which are meeting a need in the community.


REC 1 Interactive Map

DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD RESULT IN THE PERMANENT LOSS OF PLAYING SPACE WILL NOT BE PERMITTED UNLESS:

(i.) SPORTS AND RECREATION FACILITIES CAN BEST BE RETAINED AND ENHANCED THROUGH THE REDEVELOPMENT OF A SMALL PART OF THE SITE, OR

(ii.) ALTERNATIVE PROVISION OF EQUIVALENT COMMUNITY BENEFIT IS MADE AVAILABLE, OR

(iii.) THE LAND IS NOT REQUIRED TO SATISFY KNOWN LOCAL NEEDS.


Children’s Play

4.57 It is important that children have the opportunity to play together safely close to their homes. Play areas are particularly important in inner urban areas where there are fewer private gardens. At Primrose Hill, Stockton, a key part of the recent derelict land reclamation scheme was the provision of play opportunities for children of low mobility. Likewise, at Hardwick a new play area is being sought as part of the Hardwick Tomorrow initiative.

4.58 A number of play areas will be provided as part of the continuing development of Ingleby Barwick. Development briefs, produced jointly between the Council and the main developer will specify the location and form of these areas.

4.59 There have been problems in the past over the siting of play areas, which have caused annoyance to adjoining residents. The Council intends to prepare a strategy for play within the Borough based on the use of existing play areas. Local standards will then be produced for the provision of play areas within new housing development. These will also provide a target for improving play facilities within established residential areas.


REC 2 Interactive Map

A SITE IS IDENTIFIED FOR AN EQUIPPED PLAY AREA AT PRIMROSE HILL, STOCKTON


Informal Open Space

4.60 In addition to playing fields and play areas, there are many areas of informal open space within the Borough. These are valuable in a number of ways: they form part of the character and identity of a locality; they are refuges for wildlife; they may offer opportunities for quiet relaxation and they provide contact with the natural world.

4.61 Stockton Borough is characterised by a large number of open areas along the beck valleys. These are ideal for informal recreation as they offer easy access to a large number of people.

4.62 The quality of informal open space within the Borough varies widely. Much of it is attractive and is well used by local people. However, there are many other open areas which are drab and featureless and are not used regularly. These areas could be significantly enhanced by tree planting, footpath improvement and more varied management.

4.63 Environmental improvements to three key sites in inner Stockton form part of the City Challenge programme. These will take place alongside other improvements as part of neighbourhood regeneration schemes at Queen’s Park, Portrack and Tilery, and Blue Hall.


REC 3 Interactive Map

A PROGRAMME OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS WILL TAKE PLACE WITHIN THE AREAS OF OPEN SPACE AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:

(a.) QUEEN’S PARK;

(b.) PORTRACK AND TILERY;

(c.) BLUE HALL.


OBJECTIVE 2

to promote a wide range of recreation opportunities which cater for all sections of the community.

Park at Ingleby Barwick

4.64 A park has been provided within the major centre area at Ingleby Barwick in order to meet the recreational needs of that community, as agreed in the development brief for Sober Hall and Round Hill, Ingleby Barwick, produced in 1991. It will provide for both formal and informal recreation.


REC 4 Interactive Map

A PARK WILL BE PROVIDED AS PART OF THE MAJOR CENTRE AREA AT INGLEBY BARWICK


Informal Parks at Cowpen Bewley and Stillington

4.65 The Council proposes to develop the former Cowpen Bewley Tip/Greatham Brickworks site, an area of 33.5 hectares, as a recreational and wildlife resource. The proposed park offers an opportunity to implement the Community Forest in the north of the Borough by planting a large woodland area promoting wildlife conservation and informal countryside recreation. The site straddles the Stockton-Hartlepool boundary, although virtually all of the site lies within Stockton Borough. A similar reclamation scheme will also be undertaken by the Council on the site of the former ironworks at Stillington.


REC 5 Interactive Map

A WILDLIFE PARK Will BE DEVELOPED ON THE FORMER COWPEN BEWLEY TIP/GREATHAM BRICKWORKS SITE.


REC 6 Interactive Map

THE SITE OF THE FORMER IRONWORK AT STILLINGTON WILL BE RECLAIMED TO FORM A PARK FOR INFORMAL RECREATION AND NATURE CONSERVATION.


Country Parks

4.66 A significant proportion of trips to the countryside are made to sites managed specifically for sport or recreation. Country parks offer the opportunity for many people within the urban area to enjoy the countryside close at hand. The use of these sites can also relieve pressure on sensitive areas of landscape.

4.67 The Borough already contains two country parks, the Castle Eden Walkway and Billingham Beck Valley. It is proposed to extend the Castle Eden Walkway Country Park southwards to include the stretch of the former railway track between the operational railway and the limits to development. This link could be achieved either by constructing a bridge over the railway or, if it ceases to be operational, by crossing at ground level. Further development of facilities for informal quiet recreation will take place in both Parks.


REC 7 Interactive Map

THE CASTLE EDEN WALKWAY WILL BE EXTENDED SOUTHWARDS ALONG THE FORMER RAILWAY TRACK AS FAR AS THE LIMITS TO DEVELOPMENT AT BISHOPSGARTH.


4.68 There is great potential along both the Tees and Leven Valleys to develop a country park, and land is identified to be protected for this purpose. This is likely to be developed for recreation purposes over a period of time: opportunities to extend footpath links into the valleys and provide other recreation facilities will be sought in association with the development of Ingleby Barwick. The Council will consult with landowners and occupiers before designation takes place.


REC 8 Interactive Map

LAND ALONG THE TEES AND LEVEN VALLEYS WILL BE DESIGNATED AS A COUNTRY PARK


OBJECTIVE 3

to identify appropriate locations for new outdoor recreation development.

Outdoor Recreation Uses

4.69 Outdoor recreation is often an appropriate use within areas identified as Green Wedge (see Policy EN 14) and at the edge of the urban area. It can act as a buffer between agricultural and urban uses, protecting the former from vandalism and trespass. Recreation provision is also a key objective of the Community Forest initiative (see paragraphs 2.35–2.37 and Policy EN 11) which offers an opportunity to provide new areas of amenity open space.

4.70 There has been a number of proposals for golf courses recently. These may not easily be restored to agricultural use and so they should avoid the best agricultural land (see Policy EN 10). Planning permission has been granted for courses at Little Maltby Farm, Ingleby Barwick, Red Hall Farm, Longnewton: Harper Garden Centre, Norton; and for two courses at Wynyard Park.


REC 9 Interactive Map

OUTDOOR RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS WILL BE PERMITTED IN THE GREEN WEDGES AND IN THE COUNTRYSIDE PROVIDED THAT:

(i.) THEY DO NOT RESULT IN THE IRREVERSIBLE LOSS OF GRADE 1, 2 OR 3A AGRICULTURAL LAND; AND

(ii.) BUILDINGS ARE SITED, DESIGNED AND LANDSCAPED TO COMPLEMENT THE SURROUNDINGS; AND

(iii.) THERE IS NO UNDUE DISTURBANCE TO OCCUPIERS OF NEARBY PROPERTIES OR OTHER COUNTRYSIDE USERS; AND

(iv.) THE ROAD NETWORK IS CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING THE DEVELOPMENT


OBJECTIVE 4

to develop a network of recreational footpaths and cycleways.

Footpaths and Cycleways

4.71 There is great potential for meeting recreational needs by developing the existing rights of way network, and forming long distance trails and circular routes. In particular, routes linking areas of open space within and at the edge of the urban area are likely to be used by a large number of people, and are of special value to those who do not have access to a car. The effect of development on a public right of way will be a material consideration in the determination of applications for planning permission. Where rights of way are affected every attempt will be made to provide an alternative route which would be generally acceptable.


REC 10 (No map)

THE EFFECT OF DEVELOPMENT ON PUBLIC RIGHTS OF WAY WILL BE CONSIDERED IN THE DETERMINATION OF APPLICATIONS FOR PLANNING PERMISSION. WHERE RIGHTS OF WAY ARE AFFECTED EVERY ATTEMPT WILL BE MADE TO PROVIDE AN ALTERNATIVE ROUTE WHICH WOULD BE GENERALLY ACCEPTABLE TO THE PUBLIC.


4.72 Stockton is fortunate in having a number of beck valleys which penetrate the built up area and where many informal paths are already well used. The Castle Eden Walkway which follows a disused railway line is the best developed recreational route in the Borough. Despite the fact that it is divided into an urban and rural section by an operational railway, it is a long term objective to link these two routes (see paragraph 4.67 and REC 7). The Walkway also offers a number of opportunities to link up with other paths to form longer routes.


REC 11 Interactive Map

THE FOLLOWING ROUTES ARE DESIGNATED AS RECREATIONAL FOOTPATHS AND WILL BE IMPROVED AND SIGNPOSTED AS NECESSARY:

(a.) THE TEESDALE WAY

(b.) THE HARTBURN, FAIRFIELD, ELM TREE CIRCULAR ROUTE

(c.) BILLINGHAM BECK VALLEY AND CASTLE EDEN WALKWAY CIRCULAR ROUTE

(d.) NORTH STOCKTON TO RIVER TEES

(e.) STAINSBY BECK


4.73 An Ingleby Barwick Footpaths and Cycleways Study has been undertaken and shows proposed footpath and cycle routes in and around Ingleby Barwick. A number of cycle routes are proposed along the Tees and are identified below (see paragraph 4.86–4.88 and Policy REC 20).

OBJECTIVE 5

to promote the recreational potential of the River Tees.

River Tees

4.74 The new Tees Barrage has had a dramatic impact on the recreational potential of the river in a number of ways. The higher water level enhances the appearance of the river and its banks, and gives a more constant area of water. The improved water quality has also greatly increased the river’s attractiveness for recreation.

4.75 The river is well used by anglers and watersport enthusiasts pursuing a wide variety of activities, namely canoeing, rowing, cruising and water-skiing. The continued development of the river for recreational purposes will require care if the conflicting requirements of these and other interests are to be accommodated.

4.76 One way of doing this is through zoning the river to give priority to particular uses on different parts of the river. A management policy for the river’s recreational use is being prepared by representatives of the Local Authorities, the Environment Agency (containing the National Rivers Authority) landowners and various user groups.

4.77 The Tees Barrage and Upstream River Recreation and Amenity Plan covers both land use and management aspects of the future use of the river. In broad terms it proposes that the river be divided into three distinct sections and that the type and level of recreational activity in each area should be appropriate to its character. These are:-

4.78 The next few sections refer to many of the Plan’s proposals which have implications for land adjoining the river. A number of these were contained in the previous River Tees Recreation and Amenity Plan, prepared by the County Council in 1981.

Canoe Slalom and Cable Ski Courses

4.79 The Barrage will provide the opportunity to develop specific recreation facilities based on the river. A canoe slalom course and associated water activity centre is proposed by the Teesside Development Corporation near the Barrage on the north bank, between Cleveland Industrial Estate and Portrack Marshes. Provision will be made in this area for a caravan and camping site. The Corporation also plan to flood land within a bend of the river adjacent to The Holmes, Bowesfield, to provide a lake for cable skiing. This is a form of water skiing in which the skier is towed by a line attached to an overhead cable, rather than a boat.


REC 12 Interactive Map

A CANOE SLALOM COURSE AND WATER ACTIVITY CENTRE WILL BE DEVELOPED ON THE NORTH BANK OF THE RIVER BETWEEN THE CLEVELAND INDUSTRIAL ESTATE AND PORTRACK MARSHES. A SITE IN THIS AREA IS ALSO IDENTIFIED FOR CAMPING AND CARAVANNING.


REC 13 Interactive Map

A LAKE WILL BE FORMED ADJACENT TO THE HOLMES, BOWESFIELD, STOCKTON, TO PROVIDE A CABLE SKIING COURSE.


Moorings

4.80 There is likely to be a demand for moorings along the upstream river which can be used both for overnight stays and on a permanent basis. In the lower reaches boating clubs may be able to provide some visitor moorings. This facility could also be accommodated in the vicinity of the Teesdale site and Stockton Quayside where use can be made for shops, pubs and restaurants. It may be possible to provide overnight moorings near the lock which can be used by boats just entering or preparing to leave the upstream river.

4.81 Different sizes of moorings may be appropriate in different parts of the river. In general it will be desirable to have smaller facilities in the quieter upstream area. Vehicular access may only be required for permanent moorings. For these moorings provision will also need to be made for other services including drinking water, sewage pump out, chemical closet toilets and refuse collection. The factors which will be considered in assessing the suitability of any site for permanent moorings will include the visual impact of the proposal, arrangements for access and parking, and the appearance of ancillary structures to house sanitary facilities. It is not anticipated that permanent moorings would include a slipway for launching boats, other than in connection with those sites identified in Policy REC 17.


REC 14 Interactive Map

OVERNIGHT MOORINGS WILL BE PERMITTED AT:

(a.) YARM;

(b.) PRESTON PARK;

(c.) TEES MOTOR BOAT CLUB;

(d.) STOCKTON QUAYSIDE;

(e.) TEESDALE BASINS, THORNABY;

(f.) FORMER MALLEABLE SITE, STOCKTON;

(g.) EITHER SIDE OF THE LOCK AT THE BARRAGE.

THE SUITABILITY OF ANY OF THESE SITES FOR PERMANENT MOORINGS WILL BE ASSESSED ACCORDING TO:

(i.) THE VISUAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL; AND

(ii.) THE ARRANGEMENTS FOR ACCESS AND PARKING; AND

(iii.) THE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY OF NEAR-BY RESIDENTS; AND

(vi.) THE APPEARANCE OF ANCILLARY STRUCTURES TO HOUSE SANITARY FACILITIES.


REC 15 (No map)

PROPOSALS FOR FURTHER OVERNIGHT MOORINGS WILL BE ASSESSED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

(i.) THE LIKELY VISUAL IMPACT OF THESE FACILITIES ON THE LANDSCAPE OF THE AREA; AND

(ii.) THE PROVISION OF ADEQUATE VEHICULAR ACCESS AND PARKING, WHERE APPROPRIATE; AND

(iii.) THE PROVISION OF APPROPRIATE SANITARY FACILITIES; AND

(iv.) THE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY OF NEARBY RESIDENTS


Marina

4.82 When the Barrage is complete there will be demand for an extensive area to be given over to permanent moorings and associated marine services, possibly including an area for repairs, clubhouse and shop. However, there is only a very small number of suitable areas where such moorings would be acceptable because of the impact caused by access and parking, landtake and visual appearance, and the need to have reasonable sightlines along the river. A site at Bowesfield, Stockton, is considered to meet these criteria and is identified as a suitable site for a marina.


REC 16 Interactive Map

A SITE IS IDENTIFIED FOR A MARINA AT BOWESFIELD, STOCKTON.


Public Landing Points

4.83 Well designed and strategically placed landing points will make the upstream river an attractive and useful navigation. Concentrating activity and providing facilities at a limited number of sites will preserve other sections of the upstream river and discourage random bankside landings. Where possible each landing point should comprise two parts, to allow use by a riverbus, and also motor-cruisers, dinghies and canoes. This will ensure an efficient use of resources and control the number of landing points. Provision for a landing point has already been made by the National Rivers Authority (now contained within the Environment Agency) at the rear of the Safeway car park in Yarm in conjunction with the Flood Defence Scheme.


REC 17 Interactive Map

PUBLIC LANDING POINTS WILL BE PERMITTED AT:

(a.) DOWNSTREAM OF YARM BRIDGE (NEXT TO BLUE BELL PUB);

(b.) REAR OF SAFEWAY CAR PARK, YARM;

(c.) JUNCTION OF THE RIVER TEES AND LEVEN;

(d.) PRESTON PARK;

(e.) CABLE SKI SITE, BOWESFIELD, STOCKTON;

(f.) STOCKTON QUAYSIDE;

(g.) TEESDALE, STOCKTON (BOTH BASINS);

(h.) FORMER MALLEABLE SITE, STOCKTON;

(i.) TEESDALE, IMMEDIATELY UPSTREAM OF BARRAGE.


Slipways

4.84 There are a number of slipways on the River at present including Stockton Quay and the Tees Motor Boat Club. The number of slipways will be restricted to try and encourage the harmonious use of the river. Slipways will therefore only be allowed in locations where they can be reached by good road access, and can provide adequate parking and shore facilities.


REC 18 Interactive Map

FURTHER SLIPWAYS WILL BE PERMITTED AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS;

PROPOSED CABLE SKI SITE, BOWESFIELD, STOCKTON; ON THE NORTH BANK, IMMEDIATELY UPSTREAM OF THE BARRAGE.


REC 19 Interactive Map

PROPOSALS FOR NEW SLlPWAYS WILL BE ASSESSED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

(i.) THE AVAILABILITY OF GOOD ROAD ACCESS; AND

(ii.) THE PROVISION OF ADEQUATE PARKING AND SHORE FACILITIES; AND

(iii.) THE AVAILABILITY OF OTHER SLIPWAYS IN THE VICINITY.


Parking Areas

4.85 Increased recreational use of the Tees will lead to a demand for car parking close to the river. An improved parking area to the front of the Blue Bell pub at Eaglescliffe has been constructed to afford better access to the river adjacent to Yarm Bridge. Land adjoining the site of the former tannery works at Aislaby Road, Eaglescliffe, is identified as suitable for a small parking area.

Footpath/Cycleway Links Along the Tees

4.86 Increased recreational use of the river is likely to generate demand for riverside footpath and cycle routes. The most complete footpath along the river is the Teesdale Way, a route of regional importance. In a few parts of the Borough the Teesdale Way has to move away from the river banks, notably at Eaglescliffe Golf Club.

4.87 The Development Corporation have constructed a footpath/cycleway link along the river at Teesdale. The proposed Tees and Leven Country Park and the Thornaby Bypass also offer opportunities to form new routes, to cross the river, and thus develop circular routes.

4.88 A number of links or new routes are proposed. Those which were proposed in the River Tees Plan are identified accordingly:


REC 20 Interactive Map

THE FOLLOWING FOOTPATH AND CYCLE ROUTES ARE PROPOSED:

(a.) A FOOTPATH FROM YARM TO THE BOROUGH BOUNDARY ALONG THE SOUTH BANK OF THE TEES;

(b.) A FOOTPATH FROM LEVEN BRIDGE (AT LOW LANE, NEAR YARM) TO ITS JUNCTION WITH THE TEES, THEN A COMBINED FOOTPATH AND CYCLE ROUTE ALONG THE EAST BANK OF THE TEES TO THE THORNABY BYPASS BRIDGE;

(c.) A CYCLE ROUTE ALONG THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF EAGLESCLIFFE GOLF COURSE;

(d.) A COMBINED FOOTPATH/CYCLE ROUTE ON THE WEST AND NORTH BANKS OF THE TEES FROM PRESTON LANE TO THE BARRAGE;

(e.) A FOOTPATH FROM THE PROPOSED THORNABY BYPASS BRIDGE (SOUTH BANK) ALONG THE EAST BANK OF THE TEES TO SURTEES BRIDGE;

(f.) A COMBINED FOOTPATH/CYCLE ROUTE FROM SURTEES BRIDGE (SOUTH BANK) THROUGH TEESDALE TO THE BARRAGE AND THE BOROUGH BOUNDARY.


REC 21 Interactive Map

THE FOLLOWING SITES ARE IDENTIFIED AS SUITABLE LOCATIONS FOR BRIDGES FOR COMBINED PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLE USE:

(a.) IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF THE EAGLESCLIFFE GOLF CLUB;

(b.) PRESTON PARK;

(c.) ACROSS THE LEVEN RIVER, IMMEDIATELY UPSTREAM OF ITS JUNCTION WITH THE TEES.


OBJECTIVE 6

to remedy the deficiency of indoor recreation facilities.

Indoor Recreation

4.89 The Sports Council carried out a study of the demand for indoor sports facilities in the Northern Region in 1990. This estimated a shortfall of nine indoor sports halls in Stockton Borough. The Council will carry out a study of the use of its indoor sports facilities and prepare a strategy for further provision.

Dual Use of Facilities

4.90 There is scope for increasing the number of facilities accessible to the community through the dual use of existing facilities such as school halls, gymnasia and swimming pools in urban areas, and village or community halls in rural areas. As with playing fields, the impact of the local management of schools on joint arrangements remains to be seen. In addition, in rural areas, there may be opportunities for providing indoor recreation through the re-use of redundant agricultural buildings (see Policy EN 20).

4.91 The Council’s role in providing new recreation facilities will be mainly through working with other agencies.


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